Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting 8th Edition Granof,

Test Bank and Solution manual Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting: Concepts and Practices, 8th Edition Granof, Khumawala, Calabrese, Smith 2019 

 

Test Bank and Instructor Solution Manual

  • Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting: Concepts and Practices, 8th Edition Granof, Khumawala, Calabrese, Smith 2019 Test Bank

    Test Bank for Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting: Concepts and Practices, 8th Edition Granof, Khumawala, Calabrese, Smith 2019

     

    Paperback: 624 pages

  • Publisher: Wiley; 8th edition  (December 26, 2018)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 111949585
  • ISBN-13: 978-1119495857

its the TEST BANK and Solution Manual

not the TEXTBOOK

 

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Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting 8th Edition Granof, Test Bank and solution manual

 

DESCRIPTION

Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting highlights the dynamic nature and constant evolution of the field and the intellectual challenges it presents.  Designed to assist both preparers and potential users of financial reports, this book emphasizes concepts over rules and regulations to help students think critically and consider the effectiveness of alternate methodologies. Real-world examples demonstrate the similarities and differences between the public and private sectors—and how each might approach the same issue—and complete coverage of relevant reporting standards and practices aligns with the latest GASB, FASB, and AICPA changes. 

A central goal of this text is to make students aware of the reasons behind the guidelines and standards, and consider their strengths, limitations, applications, and alternatives. Much more than simply an invaluable preparation resource for the CPA and CGFM exams, this book lays the intellectual foundation that allows the students of today to become the leaders of tomorrow: the members of the standard‐setting boards, partners of CPA firms, government and not‐for‐profit executives, legislative and governing board members, and more.

Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting: Concepts and Practices, 8th Edition

Michael H. GranofSaleha B. KhumawalaThad D. CalabreseDaniel L. Smith

ISBN: 978-1-119-49581-9 December 2018 816 Pages

 

Preface vi

1 The Government and Not-for-Profit Environment 1

How Do Governments and Not-For-Profits Compare With Businesses? 2

In Practice: Why is State and Local Government Accounting Important? 5

What Other Characteristics of Governments and Not‐For‐Profits Have Accounting Implications? 8

How Do Governments Compare With Not‐For‐Profits? 11

What Are the Overall Purposes of Financial Reporting? 12

Who Are the Users, and what are the Uses of Financial Reports? 13

What Are the Specific Objectives of Financial Reporting as Set Forth by The GASB and The FASB? 16

Example: Clash among Reporting Objectives 17

Do Differences in Accounting Principles Really Matter? 20

In Practice: Will Accounting Changes Make a Difference? 21

Who Establishes Generally Accepted Accounting Principles? 21

In Practice: Assessing the Profitability of a Atheletic Program 22

In Practice: Governments and Not-For-Profits May Also Be Aggressive in Their Accounting 23

Summary 26

Key Terms in This Chapter 26

Questions for Review and Discussion 26

Exercises 27

Continuing Problem 30

Problems 30

Questions For Research, Analysis, And Discussion 36

2 Fund Accounting 37

What Is a Fund? 37

What Are the Key Elements of Government Financial Statements? 38

What Characterizes Funds? 39

Example: Fund Accounting in a School District 44

How Can Funds Be Combined and Consolidated? 47

What Are the Main Types of a Government’s Funds? 54

What’s Notable about Each Type of Governmental Fund? 57

What’s Notable about Each Type of Proprietary Fund? 60

What’s Notable about Each Type of Fiduciary Fund? 66

What is Included in a Government’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR)? 67

Example: Government‐Wide Statement of Activities 70

How Do the Funds and Annual Reports of Not‐For‐Profits Differ from Those of Governments? 71

Summary 74

Key Terms in This Chapter 76

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 76

Questions for Review and Discussion 77

Exercises 78

Continuing Problem 82

Problems 83

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 91

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 91

3 Issues of Budgeting and Control 95

What Are the Key Purposes of Budgets? 96

Why Is More Than One Type of Budget Necessary? 96

How Are Expenditures and Revenues Classified? 98

Why Are Performance Budgets Necessary? 99

What Are the Key Phases for the Budget Cycle? 101

In Practice: Budgeting and Legislative Constraints 105

On What Basis of Accounting Are Budgets Prepared? 106

In Practice: States Balance Their Budgets the Painless Way 107

In Practice: The Cost of GAAP 108

In Practice: Balancing the Budget by Selling Assets to Yourself 109

What Cautions Must Be Taken in Budget‐to‐Actual Comparisons? 109

How Does Budgeting in Not‐For‐Profit Organizations Compare with That in Governments? 112

How do Budgets Enhance Control? 113

What are the Distinctive Ways Governments Record their Budgets? 114

Example: Budgetary Entries 115

An Alternative Method: Crediting or Debiting the Difference between Revenues and Expenditures to“Budgetary Control” 117

How Does Encumbrance Accounting Prevent Overspending? 118

Example: The Encumbrance Cycle—Year 1 118

Example: The Encumbrance Cycle—Year 2 120

Example: Impact of Encumbrances on Fund Balance 121

Are Budgetary and Encumbrance Entries Really Needed? 123

Summary 124

Key Terms in This Chapter 124

Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 124

Questions for Review and Discussion 125

Exercises 126

Continuing Problem 132

Problems 132

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 142

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 143

4 Recognizing Revenues in Governmental Funds 145

Why and How Do Governments Use the Modified Accrual Basis? 146

What Are the Main Types of Nonexchange Revenues and the Limitations on How and When They Can Be Used? 149

How Should Property Taxes and Other Imposed Nonexchange Revenues Be Accounted For? 150

In Practice: Natural Disasters Raise New Problems for Accountants and Auditors 150

Example: Property Taxes 151

Example: Fines 155

How Should Sales Taxes and Other Derived Tax Revenues Be Accounted For? 156

Example: Sales Taxes 157

Example: Sales Taxes Collected by State 158

Example: Income Taxes 159

What are Tax Abatements and Why and How Must They Be Disclosed? 161

How Should Grants and Similar Government-Mandated and Voluntary Nonexchange Revenues Be Accounted For? 162

Example: Unrestricted Grant with Time Requirement 163

Example: Grant with Purpose Restriction 163

Example: Reimbursement (Eligibility Requirement) Grant 163

Example: Unrestricted Grant with Contingency Eligibility Requirement 164

Example: Endowment Gift 164

Example: Pledges 164

Example: Payments in Lieu of Taxes 165

Example: Donations of Land for Differing Purposes 165

Example: On-Behalf Payments 168

How Should Sales of Capital Assets Be Accounted For? 168

Example: Sales of Capital Assets 169

How Should Licenses, Permits, and Other Exchange Transactions Be Accounted For? 170

Example: License Fees 170

How Should Governments Report Revenues in Their Government-Wide Statements? 171

Summary 171

Key Terms in This Chapter 173

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 173

Questions for Review and Discussion 173

Exercises 174

Continuing Problem 180

Problems 180

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 188

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 189

5 Recognizing Expenditures in Governmental Funds 191

How Is The Accrual Concept Modified for Expenditures? 192

In Practice: Tax Expenditures That Are Actually Reductions in Revenue 193

Example: Wages and Salaries 194

How Should Compensated Absences Be Accounted For? 195

In Practice: Changing the Pay Date by One Day 195

Example: Vacation Leave 195

Example: Sick Leave 197

Example: Sabbatical Leave 198

How Should Pensions and Other Postemployment Benefits Be Accounted for? 199

Example: Pension Expenditure 199

How Should Claims and Judgments Be Accounted For? 200

Example: Claims and Judgments 200

How Should the Acquisition and Use of Materials and Supplies Be Accounted For? 202

Example: Supplies 202

How Should Prepayments Be Accounted For? 205

Example: Prepayments 205

How Should Capital Assets Be Accounted For? 205

Example: Capital Assets 206

Example: Installment Notes 207

Example: Capital Leases 208

How Should Interest and Principal on Long-Term Debt Be Accounted For? 208

Example: Long‐term Debt 209

In Practice: California School children May Pay for Their Own Education 210

How Should Nonexchange Expenditures be Accounted for? 211

Example: Unrestricted Grant with Time Requirement 212

Example: Grant with Purpose Restriction 212

Example: Reimbursement (Eligibility Requirement) Grant 212

How Should Interfund Transactions Be Accounted For? 213

Example: Interfund Transfer 214

Example: Interfund Purchase/Sale 214

What Constitutes other Financing Sources and Uses? 215

How Should Revenues, Expenditures, and Other Financing Sources and Uses be Reported? 216

What Is the Significance of the Current Financial Governmental Fund Statements? An Overview 217

Summary 217

Key Terms in This Chapter 218

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 219

Questions for Review and Discussion 219

Exercises 220

Continuing Problem 226

Problems 227

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 235

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 235

6 Accounting for Capital Projects and Debt Service 239

How do Governments Account for Capital Projects Funds? 240

Example: Bond Issue Costs 242

Example: Bond Premiums and Discounts 242

Comprehensive Example: Main Types of Transactions Accounted for in Capital Projects Funds 243

How do Governments Account for Resources Dedicated to Debt Service? 246

Comprehensive Example: Main Types of Transactions Accounted for in Debt Service Funds 248

How do Governments Handle Special Assessments? 251

In Practice: Use and Abuse of Special Assessments 252

Accounting for Special Assessments in Proprietary Funds 254

In Practice: What We Might Learn From “Net Investment in Capital Assets” 256

How Can Governments Benefit from Debt Refundings? 257

Example: Debt Refundings 257

In Practice: Current and Advance Refundings 258

Example: In‐Substance Defeasance 259

Summary 261

Key Terms in This Chapter 262

Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 262

Questions for Review and Discussion 263

Exercises 264

Continuing Problem 269

Problems 270

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 280

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 280

7 Capital Assets and Investments in Marketable Securities 284

What Accounting Practices Do Governments Follow for General Capital Assets? 285

Example: Trade-Ins 288

Why and How Should Governments Report Infrastructure? 289

In Practice: Nation’s Infrastructure Earns a Cumulative Grade of D+ 290

In Practice: Fair Values May (Or May Not) Facilitate Sales Decisions 295

How Should Governments Account for Assets That Are Impaired? 296

Example: Restoration Approach 296

Example: Service Units approach 297

Example: Deflated Depreciated Replacement Cost Approach 298

What Issues Are the Critical Issues With Respect to Marketable Securities and Other Investments? 298

Example: Investment Income 301

In Practice: Some Governments May Make Suboptimal Investment Decisions in Order to Avoid Financial Statement Volatility 303

Example: Interest Income 303

In Practice: One Common-Type Derivative 305

In Practice: Investment Debacles 305

In Practice: Common sense Investment Practices 307

Summary 307

Key Terms in this Chapter 308

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 308

Questions for Review and Discussion 309

Exercises 309

Continuing Problem 313

Problems 314

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 323

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 323

8 Long-Term Obligations 325

Why is Information on Long-Term Debt Important to Statement Users? 326

Can Governments and Not-For-Profits Go Bankrupt? 326

In Practice: It is Not So Easy to Declare Municipal Bankruptcy 327

How Do Governments Account for Long-Term Obligations? 328

Example: Accounting for Bonds in Government-Wide Statements 330

In Practice: Valuing a Lottery Prize 331

What Constitutes a Government’s Long-Term Debt? 331

Example: Demand Bonds 333

Example: Bond Anticipation Notes 334

Example: Tax Anticipation Notes 334

Example: Lessee Accounting 336

Example: Lessor Accounting 337

Example: Overlapping Debt 342

In Practice: 49Ers Score Big in the Financial Arena 344

In Practice: Tobacco Bonds are Both Risky and Inconsistent with Government Policies 345

What Other Information Do Users Want to Know About Outstanding Debt? 346

Example: Debt Margin 347

What are Bond Ratings, and why are They Important? 349

Summary 350

Key Terms in this Chapter 350

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 351

Questions for Review and Discussion 351

Exercises 352

Continuing Problem 358

Problems 358

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 366

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 366

9 Business-Type Activities 368

What Types of Funds Involve Business-Type Activities? 369

Why Do Governments and Not-For-Profits Engage in Business-Type Activities? 369

Should Business-Type Activities be accounted for differently than Governmental Activities? 370

What are the Three Basic Statements of Proprietary Fund Accounting? 372

What Accounting Issues are Unique to Enterprise Funds of Governments? 376

Example: Revenue Bond Proceeds as Restricted Assets 380

Example: Landfill Costs in an Enterprise Fund 382

Example: Pollution Remediation Costs in an Enterprise Fund 385

What are Internal Service Funds, and how are they accounted for? 386

Example: Internal Service Fund Accounting 390

In Practice: Full-Cost Pricing May Encourage Dysfunctional Decisions 391

Example: Insurance Premiums 394

Example: Self-Insurance in a General Fund 395

How are Proprietary Funds Reported? 396

Example: Eliminating Interfund Balances and Transactions 397

In Practice: Want to Own a Bridge? 399

Summary 401

Key Terms in this Chapter 402

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 403

Questions for Review and Discussion 403

Exercises 406

Continuing Problem 411

Problems 411

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 421

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 421

10 Pensions and Other Fiduciary Activities 423

Why is Pension accounting so important? 423

In Practice: Funded Status of State Defined Benefit Plans—Ten Best and Ten Worst 425

How do Defined Contribution Plans Differ from Defined Benefit Plans? 425

In Practice: Defined Benefit Plans are More Efficient than Defined Contribution Plans 426

In Practice: Can Defined Benefit Plans be saved? 427

What are the Distinctions among Single, Agent Multiple-Employer, and Cost-Sharing Plans? 428

What is the Relationship between an Employer and its Pension Plan? 428

What is the Underlying Rationale for the Gasb Approach? 429

How Should the Employer Measure its Pension Obligation? 429

How Should the Pension Expense in Full Accrual Statements be Determined? 431

Example: The Pension Expense 433

How Should the Pension Expenditure in Governmental Funds be Determined? 436

What Special Problems do Multiple-Employer Cost-Sharing Plans Pose? 436

How Should the Pension Plan be accounted for? 437

What Types of Disclosures are required? 439

How Should Postemployment

Benefits other than Pensions (Opeb) be accounted for? 440

What are Fiduciary Funds? 441

In Practice: Difficulty of Determining Whether an Activity is Fiduciary or Governmental 445

Should Investment Income of a Permanent Fund be reported in the Permanent Fund Itself or the Beneficiary Fund 448

Example: Expendable Investment Income 449

Summary 449

Key Terms in this Chapter 450

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 450

Questions for Review and Discussion 452

Exercises 452

Continuing Problem 456

Problems 456

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 463

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 463

11 Issues of Reporting, Disclosure, and Financial Analysis 465

How Can a Government Prepare Government‐Wide Statements from Fund Statements? 465

Why is the Reporting Entity an Issue for Governments? 467

Example: The Reporting Entity 467

What Criteria Have Been Established for Government Reporting Entities? 468

Example: Financially Accountable Component Units 469

Example: Fiscal Dependency 470

Example: Blended Component Units 471

Example: A Closely Affiliated Organization 474

Example: Application of Current Standards 475

What Other Elements Make Up the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report? 477

What Are the Reporting Requirements for Special‐Purpose Governments? 481

How Can A Government’s Fiscal Condition be Assessed? 483

In Practice: Balanced Budget Requirements Don’t Always Result in Balanced Budgets 492

Drawing Conclusions 501

Summary 501

Key Terms in This Chapter 502

Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 502

Questions for Review and Discussion 503

Exercises 504

Continuing Problem 509

Problems 510

Questions for Research, Analysis, and Discussion 516

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 516

12 Not-for-Profit Organizations 519

Who’s In Charge? 519

What Should be the Form and Content of Financial Statements? 520

What is an Endowment? 523

Example: Reporting Revenues and Expenses 527

What Are the Main Types of Contributions, and How Should Pledges be accounted for? 532

In Practice: Even the Very Wealthy Sometimes Renege on their Contributions 536

Example: Pledges 536

When Should Use-Restricted (Purpose-Restricted) Contributions Be Recognized? 538

Example: Use-Restricted Contributions 539

In Practice: A Gift with Strings Attached 540

Should Contributions of Services be recognized? 540

Example: Service Contributions 540

Should Receipts of Collection Items Be Recognized As Revenues? 541

In Practice: Examples of Contributed Services 541

When Should Conditional Promises be recognized? 542

In Practice: When a Contribution is Not a Contribution 542

Example: Conditional Promises 543

How Should “Pass-Through” Contributions be Accounted for? 543

Example: A Federated Fund-Raising Organization 543

Example: A Foundation That Transfers Assets to a Specified Organization 544

Example: A Foundation That Supports a Related Organization 544

When Should Gains and Losses on Investments be recognized? 545

Example: Investment Gains 546

Should Endowment Gains be Considered Net Additions to Principal or Expendable Income? 546

Example: Investment Gains 547

What are Split Interest Agressements, and How Should They be Accounted for? 548

How Should Depreciation be Reported? 549

Example: Depreciation 549

What Issues Does a Not-For-Profit Face in Establishing its Reporting Entity? 550

Comprehensive Example: Museum of American Culture 551

How Should the Costs of Fund-Raising Activities be Determined? 558

Criteria for Allocating a Portion of Costs to Program or Management Functions 558

Example: Allocating Charitable Costs 559

How Can a Not-For-Profit’s Fiscal Condition be Assessed? 561

In Practice: Not-For Profits, Like Corporations, Tainted by Scandals 563

Summary 564

Key Terms in this Chapter 565

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 565

Questions for Review and Discussion 568

Exercises 569

Problems 575

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 580

13 Colleges and Universities 581

What Unique Issues do Colleges and Universities Face? 581

Accounting for Revenues and Expenses 591

In Practice: Which Set of Standards Do We Follow? 592

In Practice: From Public to Private 593

In Practice: How Should a University Classify a Gift that May Not Be a Gift? 593

Example: Tuition and Fee Revenues 594

Other Issues 595

Example: Grants 596

Example: Student Loans 597

In Practice: How Auxiliary Enterprises Can Be Misused 598

Comprehensive Example: Mars University 599

Evaluating the Fiscal Wherewithal of Colleges and Universities 603

Summary 605

Key Terms in this Chapter 605

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 605

Questions for Review and Discussion 608

Exercises 608

Problems 612

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 618

14 Health Care Providers 620

In Practice: Hospitals Face Economic Challenges While Also Implementing Policy Changes 621

What Unique Issues do Health Care Providers Face? 622

What are the Key Differences Between Private Not-For-Profit and Government Health-Care Providers? 623

What Are The Basic Financial Statements? 623

How Are Key Revenues and Expenses Recognized? 628

Example: Patient Care Revenues 628

Example: Capitation Fee Revenues 630

Example: Charity Care 631

Example: Malpractice Claims 632

Example: Retrospective Premiums 632

Comprehensive Example: Medical Center Hospital 633

How can the Fiscal Wherewithal of Health-Care Organizations be Evaluated? 638

In Practice: Financial Problems Not Caused By Single Issue 640

Summary 641

Key Terms in this Chapter 642

Exercise for Review and Self-Study 642

Questions for Review and Discussion 642

Exercises 643

Problems 649

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 655

15 Auditing Governments and Not‐for‐Profit Organizations 656

How do Audits of Governments and Not‐For‐Profits Differ from Those of Businesses? 657

How has the Yellow Book Influenced Governmental and Not‐For‐Profit Auditing? 657

What Types Of Audits Do Governments Conduct? 658

What Levels of Standards are Applicable to all Engagements? 659

In Practice: To Whom Should a City Auditor Report? 660

In Practice: Targeting Seemingly Trivial Activities 666

Example: Evidence Gathering 669

In Practice: Findings Must Relate to Program Objectives 670

How Have the Single‐Audit Act and other Pronouncements Influenced Auditing? 670

What Approach do Auditors Take in Performing Single Audits? 672

What Reports Result from Single Audits? 675

Example: Ethical Dilemma 679

Summary 680

Key Terms in this Chapter 681

Exercise for Review and Self‐Study 681

Questions for Review and Discussion 682

Exercises 683

Problems 685

Cases in Ethics 690

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 692

16 Federal Government Accounting 694

Which Agencies Are Responsible For Federal Accounting And Reporting? 697

What Constitutes The Federal Budget? 699

What Constitutes the Federal Government Reporting Entity? 701

What are the Form and Content of Government‐Wide Federal Statements? 702

What Types of Accounts are Maintained by Federal Entities? 712

What Statements are Required of Federal Agencies? 712

Example: Subsidized loan 730

Example: loan Guarantees 731

What Else Constitutes the Federal Government’s Reporting System 732

What are the key International Trends in Governmental Accounting? 733

Summary 735

Key Terms in this Chapter 736

Exercise For Review And Self‐Study 736

Questions for Review and Discussion 737

Exercises 738

Problems 742

Solution to Exercise for Review and Self-Study 749

Glossary 750

Value Tables 770

Index 779

 

  • Complete, accurate, and up-to-date coverage of all authoritative pronouncements issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB)
  • Revised to reflect the latest applicable Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) updates
  • Fully aligned with current AICPA Audit and Accounting Guide, as well as Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Government Accountability Office (GAO) publications
  • Expanded discussion highlights potentially significant changes to guidelines and standards not yet officially issued
  • Updated problems, exercises and question throughout
  • Provides insight on real-world methods through challenging practice sets that require students to justify their approach and consider alternatives
  • Features an overarching Continuing Problem that requires students to review comprehensive financial reports and answer questions as they pertain to state and local accounting principles
  • Builds critical thinking skills by asking students to analyze and interpret financial statements of actual not-for-profit and government entities
  • Provides comprehensive coverage and relevant exercises, practice questions, and reviews to help students prepare for the CPA exam and the Certified Government Financial Manager (CGFM) exam
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Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination 2e Kranacher Test Bank

Test Bank and Solution manual Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd Edition Kranacher, Riley 2019 

 

Test Bank and Instructor Solution Manual

Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd Edition Kranacher, Riley: 2019 Test Bank

Test Bank for Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd Edition Kranacher, Riley: 2019 Test Bank

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 2 edition (May 14, 2019)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1119494338
  • ISBN-13: 978-1119494331

its the TEST BANK and Solution Manual

not the TEXTBOOK

 

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Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd Edition Kranacher, Riley 2019

 

 

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Hi , 

My name is Jone im from USA i want to get this solutions manual / test bank of:

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Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd Edition

Mary-Jo KranacherRichard Riley

ISBN: 978-1-119-49417-1 May 2019

 

DESCRIPTION

Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination introduces students and professionals to the world of fraud detection and deterrence, providing a solid foundation in core concepts and methods for both public and private sector environments. Aligned with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) model curriculum, this text provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of asset misappropriation, corruption, fraud, and other topics a practicing forensic accountant encounters on a daily basis.

A focus on real-world practicality employs current examples and engaging case studies to reinforce comprehension, while in-depth discussions clarify technical concepts in an easily relatable style. End of chapter material and integrated IDEA and Tableau software cases introduces students to the powerful, user-friendly tools accounting professionals use to maximize auditing and analytic capabilities, detect fraud, and comply with documentation requirements, and coverage of current methods and best practices provides immediate relevancy to real-world scenarios. Amidst increased demand for forensic accounting skills, even for entry-level accountants, this text equips students with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully engage in the field.

Preface xii

About the Authors xiv

Section I Introduction to Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination 1

1 Core Foundation Related to Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination 3

Module 1: What is Fraud? 4

What is the Difference Between Fraud and Abuse? 8

Module 2: What is Forensic Accounting? 10

Module 3: The Professional’s Skill Set 10

Module 4: The Role of Auditing, Fraud Examination, and Forensic Accounting 11

Module 5: The Basics of Fraud 11

Module 6: The Investigation 22

Module 7: Fraud Examination Methodology 30

Critical Thinking 31

Review Questions 31

Multiple Choice Questions 31

Fraud Casebook 32

Brief Cases 32

Major Case Investigation (MCI)—Johnsons Real Estate 32

IDEA Exercises 33

IDEA—Assignment Chapter 1 34

Tableau Exercises 34

Tableau—Assignment Chapter 1 35

Endnotes 35

Appendix I: Careers in Fraud Examination and Financial Forensics 36

2 Who Commits Fraud and Why: The Profile and Psychology of the Fraudster 48

Module 1: Criminology, Fraud and Forensic Accounting 48

Module 2: Who Commits Fraud and Why: The Fraud Triangle 51

Module 3: The Role of Personal Integrity, Capability, Gender, and the Influence of the Organization 59

Module 4: The Psychology of the Fraudster, a Deeper Look: M.I.C.E., Predators, and Collusion 64

Module 5: The Fraud Triangle in Court and the Meta-Model 68

Critical Thinking 70

Review Questions 70

Multiple Choice Questions 70

Fraud Casebook 71

Brief Cases 72

Major Case Investigation 72

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 2 72

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 2 72

Endnotes 72

3 Legal, Regulatory, and Professional Environment 74

Module 1: Introduction 75

Module 2: The Rights of Individuals 75

Module 3: Probable Cause 80

Module 4: Rules of Evidence 81

Module 5: Criminal Justice System 83

Module 6: Civil Justice System 84

Basic Accounting Principles 86

Regulatory System 92

The Role of Corporate Governance 105

Critical Thinking 105

Review Questions 106

Multiple Choice Questions 106

Fraud Casebook 107

Brief Cases 107

Major Case Investigation 107

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 3 108

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 3 108

Endnotes 108

Section II Fraud Schemes 109

4 Cash Receipt Schemes and Other Asset Misappropriations 111

Module 1: Skimming Schemes—Cash 112

Module 2: Skimming Schemes—Receivables 117

Module 3: Cash Larceny Schemes 123

Module 4: Noncash Misappropriation Schemes 129

Module 5: Concealing Inventory Shrinkage 134

Module 6: Preventing and Detecting Noncash Thefts That are Concealed by Fraudulent Support 136

Critical Thinking 138

Review Questions 138

Multiple Choice Questions 139

Fraud Casebook 139

Brief Cases 140

Major Case Investigation 140

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 4 141

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 4 141

Endnotes 141

5 Cash Disbursement Schemes 142

Module 1: Billing Schemes 142

Module 2: Check Tampering Schemes 154

Module 3: Payroll Schemes 169

Module 4: Expense Reimbursement Schemes 179

Module 5: Register Disbursement Schemes 186

Critical Thinking 190

Review Questions 190

Multiple Choice Questions 190

Fraud Casebook 191

Brief Cases 191

Major Case Investigation 192

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 5 192

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 5 192

Endnotes 192

6 Corruption and the Human Factor 193

Module 1: Corruption Schemes 194

Module 2: Bribery 195

Module 3: Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) 203

Module 4: Illegal Gratuities, Economic Extortion, and Conflicts of Interest 205

Module 5: The Human Factor 210

Critical Thinking 213

Review Questions 213

Multiple Choice Questions 214

Fraud Casebook 214

Brief Cases 215

Major Case Investigation 215

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 6 216

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 6 216

Endnotes 216

7 Financial Statement Fraud 217

Module 1: Financial Reporting Fraud: Who, Why, and How 218

Module 2: Accounting Principles and Fraud 220

Module 3: Fraudulent Financial Statement Schemes 228

The Capital Forum 234

Module 4: Detection of fraudulent financial statement schemes 242

Module 5: Deterrence of Financial Statement Fraud 249

Critical Thinking 252

Review Questions 252

Multiple Choice Questions 252

Fraud Casebook 253

Brief Cases 253

Major Case Investigation 255

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 7 255

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 7 255

Endnotes 255

Section III Detection and Investigative Tools and Techniques 257

8 Fraud Detection: Red Flags and Targeted Risk Assessment 259

The Fraud Prompt—Simple and Effective 259

Module 1: Corporate Governance and Fraud 259

Module 2: Fraud Detection 266

Module 3: Targeted Fraud Risk Assessment 275

Module 4: Targeted Fraud Risk Assessment in a Digital Environment 281

Critical Thinking 282

Review Questions 282

Multiple Choice Questions 282

Fraud Casebook 283

Brief Cases 284

Major Case Investigation 285

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 8 285

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 8 286

Endnotes 286

9 Evidence-Based Fraud Examinations 287

The Fraud Triangle and the Courts 287

Module 1—Fraud Examinations: Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why 288

Module 2—Evidence 292

Organizing the Evidence and Documenting Work Product 294

Module 3—Evidence Sources of the Act, Concealment, and Conversion 295

Module 4—Evidence Sources Specific to Concealment 300

Module 5—Evidence Sources Specific to Conversion 303

Critical Thinking 317

Review Questions 317

Multiple Choice Questions 317

Fraud Casebook 318

Brief Cases 319

Major Case Investigation 320

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 9 320

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 9 321

Endnotes 321

Appendix A: Data Collection Checklist 322

10 Effective Interviewing and Interrogation 323

Module 1: Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations 324

Module 2: Details of the Interview and Interrogation Process 326

Module 3: Five Types of Interview and Interrogation Questions 328

Joe Wells’ Ten Commandments for Effective Interviews 337

Module 4: Steps in the Admission-Seeking Interview (Interrogation) 338

Module 5: Judging Deception 344

Critical Thinking 348

Review Questions 348

Multiple Choice Questions 348

Fraud Casebook 349

Brief Cases 350

Major Case Investigation 351

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 10 351

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 10 351

Endnotes 351

Appendix : Comprehensive Guidelines: Information Collected in Interviews 352

11 Using Information Technology for Fraud Examination and Financial Forensics 354

Module 1: The Digital Environment 354

Module 2: Digital Evidence 356

Module 3: Detection and Examination in a Digital Environment 359

Module 4: Graphics and Graphics Software 367

Module 5: Case Management Software 372

Critical Thinking 373

Review Questions 373

Multiple Choice Questions 374

Fraud Casebook 374

Brief Cases 375

Major Case Investigation 376

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 11 376

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 11 376

Endnotes 376

Section IV Advanced Topics in Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination 377

12 Complex Frauds and Financial Crimes 379

Former Congressman Pleads Guilty to Helping Charitable Entity with Ties to Terrorist Organization 379

Module 1: The Predator versus the Situational Fraudster 379

Module 2: Collusion among Multiple Individuals, Organizations, or Jurisdictions 380

Module 3: Dismantling Organizations using Asset Forfeiture and Seizure 381

Module 4: Schemes and Illegal Acts Associated with Complex Frauds and Financial Crimes 382

Module 5: The U.S. Banking System 391

Module 6: Tools and Techniques for Moving Money 392

Module 7: Other Complex Frauds and Financial Crimes 399

Critical Thinking 405

Review Questions 405

Multiple Choice Questions 405

Fraud Casebook 406

Brief Cases 406

Major Case Investigation 408

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 12 408

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 12 408

Endnotes 409

13 Cybercrime: Fraud in a Digital World 410

Module 1: The Digital Environment 410

Module 2: Frauds and Other Threats in the Digital World 416

Module 3: Cyber Fraud 423

Module 4: Complex Frauds and Financial Crimes in Cyberspace 426

Module 5: Reporting Cybercrime 429

Critical Thinking 429

Review Questions 429

Multiple Choice Questions 429

Fraud Casebook 430

Brief Cases 431

Major Case Investigation 431

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 13 432

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 13 432

Endnotes 432

14 Antifraud and Compliance Efforts: Ethics, Prevention, and Deterrence 433

Module 1: Ethics 433

Module 2: Compliance 439

Module 3: Fraud Deterrence 440

Module 4: Fraud Prevention 450

Critical Thinking 453

Review Questions 453

Multiple Choice Questions 454

Fraud Casebook 454

Brief Cases 455

Major Case Investigation 455

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 14 455

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 14 456

Endnotes 456

Section V Litigation Advisory Services and Remediation 457

15 Consulting, Litigation Support, and Expert Witnessing: Damages, Valuations, and Other Engagements 459

Module 1: Consulting, Litigation Support, and Expert Witnessing 459

Module 2: Commercial Damages 465

Module 3: Valuations 482

Module 4: Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, and Survival Actions 498

Critical Thinking 513

Review Questions 513

Multiple Choice Questions 513

Fraud Casebook 514

Brief Cases 514

Major Case Investigation 516

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 15 517

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 15 517

Endnotes 517

16 Remediation and Litigation Advisory Services 518

Module 1: Introduction to Remediation 519

Module 2: Recovery of Money and Other Assets 520

Module 3: Support for Criminal and Civil Court Actions 522

Module 4: Restructure the Internal Control Environment 533

Critical Thinking 541

Review Questions 541

Multiple Choice Questions 542

Fraud Casebook 542

Major Case Investigation 543

IDEA Exercises: Assignment 16 543

Tableau Exercises: Assignment 16 543

Endnotes 543

Appendix A: Fraud/Financial Crimes Report 544

Appendix B: Commercial Damages/Lost Profits Report 550

Appendix C: Valuation Report 556

Appendix D: Forensic Economics (Personal Injury) Report 585

Glossary 595

Index 599

  • Includes the most up-to-date research in the field of forensic accounting
  • Provides recent examples to highlight specific types of fraud
  • Features end of chapter material, mini cases, and major case investigations
  • Offers expanded content on data analytics and artificial intelligence
  • Based upon the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Model Curriculum for Education in Fraud and Forensic Accounting
  • Highlights “The Fraudster’s Perspective” with real-world examples of criminal fraud
  • Delves into the investigative process and the extensive array of available tools, with coverage of current best practices
  • Expands auditing and analytical abilities, enhances fraud detection, and meets documentation standards through the use of IDEA software
  • Discusses technology as a venue for fraud, with an in-depth exploration of “cybercrime” and digital fraud detection
  • Focuses on the psychology of fraud, the variety of schemes, and the various avenues for career development

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Introduction to Accounting , 8th Ainsworth, Deines Test Bank

Test Bank and Solution manual Introduction to Accounting: An Integrated Approach, 8th Edition Ainsworth, Deines 2019 

 

Introduction to Accounting: An Integrated Approach, 8th Edition Ainsworth, Deines 2019 Test Bank

Introduction to Accounting: An Integrated Approach, 8th Edition Ainsworth, Deines 2019 Test Bank

Test Bank and Instructor Solution Manual

  • Paperback: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 8 edition (June 12, 2019)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1119600103
  • ISBN-13: 978-1119600107
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1.2 x 10.8 inches

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Introduction to Accounting 8th Ainsworth, Deines Test Bank and solution manual

 

 

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ISBN: 978-1-119-60013-8 May 2019 736 Pages

DESCRIPTION

The new, revised, and updated edition of the popular textbook for introductory accounting courses

Accounting plays a central role in a multitude of areas, from everyday personal finance to global corporate operations. Introduction to Accounting helps students understand the concepts, principles, methods, and mechanisms of the field. Designed to benefit all students, regardless of major, this innovative textbook integrates life skills and business skills to provide an accessible, engaging introduction to accounting. Rather than separating financial accounting from managerial accounting, this textbook demonstrates how to plan and evaluate business activities from both external and internal reporting perspectives.

Now in its eight edition, Introduction to Accounting enables students to understand both the nature and functions of business and the mechanics of the bookkeeping process. Three organizing themes—the accounting information system, business processes, and the balanced scorecard—help students learn why and how activities are planned and evaluated by different stakeholders. Based on extensive instructor feedback, as well as the authors’ six decades of combined teaching experience, this new edition has been thoroughly revised to enhance readability and highlight real-world examples. A complete array of pedagogical tools includes improved and expanded learning objectives, updated definitions, questions and problem setsnewcritical-thinking and ethical-challenge exercises, and more.

  • Focuses on accounting as an information system used in each business processes to provide information to plan and evaluate activities
  • Stimulates interest in the field of accounting with relatable, reader-friendly narrative
  • Employs various pedagogical devices to stimulate active and cooperative learning for students
  • Uses the example of Apple, Inc. throughout the text to illustrate central concepts and significant issues
  • Includes extensive online support including test problems and essay exercises for every chapter of the text, PowerPoint slides and Excel templates, downloadable solution manuals, and links to professional resources

Offering a wealth of instructor resources, Introduction to Accounting, 8th Edition is ideally suited for introductory accounting courses in both high school and university-level settings.

Penne Ainsworth, Ph.D., CPA, CMA (inactive), and CIA (inactive),is Emeritus Professor, University of Wyoming. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska and is the former Chairperson and emeritus professor in the Department of Accounting and Finance. She was also the Associate Dean for the College of Business at the University of Wyoming. She received the AICPA Distinguished Achievement in Accounting Education Award in 2016. Her research focused on managerial accounting, accounting education, and assessment. She has been published in-Issues in Accounting Education and other journals. She was President of the Wyoming Society of CPAs in 2015-2016.

Dan Deines is Retired Professor, Kansas State University.  He received his undergraduate degree in history from Fort Hays State University, a master’s in business from Emporia State University, and his Ph.D. in accounting from the University of Nebraska. He had been at Kansas State University since 1982 and was the Ralph Crouch, KPMG Professor of Accounting. He was president of the Kansas Society of CPAs for 2003–2004; and was designated an Academic Pathfinder by the AICPA and in May 2007 received the AICPA’s Distinguished Achievement in Accounting Education Award. In 2014, he received the AICPA’s Special Recognition Award and in 2017 Emporia State University presented him with their Distinguished Alumni Award.

About the Authors 

Prologue 

Part One Introduction: Business Operating Activities 

Chapter 1 Accounting and Business 

Accounting: Who Needs It? 

Business Today 

Customer-Focused Operations 

Global Markets 

Manufacturing and Communication Advances 

E-Business 

Business and Accounting: Together Forever 

Ancient Babylonia 

Commerce in Old Italy 

Pacioli and the Method of Venice 

Advent of the Corporation

The Stock Market Crash of 1929 

Return to the Present 

Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

Statements of Financial Accounting Concepts 

International Accounting Standards 

Financial Statements 

Income Statement 

Statement of Owners’ (Shareholders’) Equity 

Statement of Cash Flows 

Balance Sheet (Statement of Financial Position) 

Comprehensive Inome

Report of the Independent Accountant (Auditor) 

Relationship of the Financial Statements 

Current Ratio 

Return on Sales Ratio 

Debt-to-Equity Ratio 

Codification of GAAP

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 2 Business Processes and Accounting Information 

Management Cycle 

Planning Phase 

Performing Phase 

Evaluating Phase 

Business Processes 

Business Organization and Strategy Process 

Operating Processes 

Capital Resources Process 

Performance Measurement and Management Process 

Balanced Scorecard Approach 

Financial Perspective 

Internal Perspective 

Customer Perspective 

Learning and Growth Perspective 

Internal Control 

Control Environment 

Risk Assessment

Control Activities

Information and Communication

Monitoring

Applying Internal Control to Protect Cash 

Cash Receipts 

Cash Disbursements 

Bank Reconciliation 

Bank Statement 

Bank Reconciliation Process 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 3 Operating Processes: Planning and Control 

Revenue Process 

Generate Sales 

Receive and Accept Orders 

Deliver Goods and/or Services 

Receive Payment from Customers 

Provide Customer Support 

Expenditure Process 

Determine the Company’s Need for Goods 

Select Suppliers and Order Goods 

Receive Goods 

Pay Suppliers 

Conversion Process 

Schedule Production 

Obtain Direct Materials 

Use Labor and Other Manufacturing Resources to Make Products 

Store Finished Goods Until Sold 

Cost and Revenue Behavior 

Behavior Patterns 

Relevant Range 

Activity Measures 

Fixed Costs and Revenues 

Variable Costs and Revenues 

Mixed Costs and Revenues 

Cost/Revenue Estimation Methods 

High/Low Method 

Summary 

Appendix: Linear Regression Analysis

Key Terms 

Part Two Planning: Operating Activities 

Chapter 4 Short-Term Decision Making 

Short-Term Decisions 

Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis 

Determining the Breakeven Point 

Determining the Target Profit Level 

Determining the Target Profit Level After Taxes 

Sensitivity Analysis 

Change in Selling Price 

Change in Variable Cost 

Change in Fixed Cost 

Change in Tax Rate 

Relevant Variable Analysis 

Sunk Costs Are Never Relevant 

Opportunity Costs Are Always Relevant 

Incremental Costs and Revenues May Be Relevant 

Identify the Alternative Actions 

Determine the Relevant Revenues, Costs, and Profit 

Choose the Best Alternative 

Special Order (Accept-or-Reject) Decision 

Outsourcing (Make-or-Buy) Decision 

Product Mix (Keep-or-Drop) Decision 

Another (More Difficult) Example 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 5 Strategic Planning Regarding Operating Processes 

Revenue Process: Determining the Selling Price 

Customers: Customer Perspective 

Competitors: Learning and Growth Perspective

Legal and Social Forces: Learning and Growth Perspective 

Cost: Internal Process Perspective 

Pricing Strategies 

Penetration Pricing 

Skimming Pricing 

Life-Cycle Pricing 

Target Pricing 

Conversion Process: Determining the Inventory Model 

Reasons to Maintain Inventory 

Reasons to Not Maintain Inventory 

Balancing Ordering and Carrying Costs 

Inventory Models 

Comparison of Inventory Models 

Expenditure Process: Determining the Employee Compensation Package 

Paid Compensation 

Health and Life Insurance 

Paid Leave 

Contingent Compensation: Bonuses 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 6 Planning, the Balanced Scorecard, and Budgeting 

Budgeting and Goal Setting 

Planning 

Communication and Coordination 

Resource Allocation 

Evaluation and Control 

Time and Resource Requirements 

Adaptability of Departments and Segments 

Motivation and Behavior of Individuals 

Mandated versus Participatory Budgeting 

Mandated Budgeting 

Participatory Budgeting 

Incremental Budgeting versus Zero-Based Budgeting 

Incremental Budgeting 

Zero-Based Budgeting 

Master Budget 

Revenue Process Planning 

Balanced Scorecard Goals 

Sales Budget 

Cash Receipts Schedule 

Accounts Receivable Schedule 

Marketing and Distribution Budget 

Conversion Process Planning 

Balanced Scorecard Goals 

Production Budget 

Expenditure Process Planning 

Balanced Scorecard Goals 

Budgeting for Human Resources 

Administrative Budget 

Cash Disbursements Schedule 

Accounts Payable Schedule 

Summary 

Appendix: Conversion Process Planning

Balanced Scorecard Goals

Production Budget

Direct Labor and Manufacturing Overhead Budget 

Direct Materials Purchases Budget 

Key Terms 

Part Three Recording and Evaluating: Operating Activities 

Chapter 7 Accounting Information Systems 

Manual Accounting Systems 

Accounting Events 

Chart of Accounts 

Journalizing 

Posting 

Adjusting Entries 

Closing Entries 

Comprehensive Example 

Computer-Based Transaction Systems 

Database Systems 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 8 Purchasing/Human Resources/Payment Process: Recording and Evaluating Expenditure Process Activities 

Expenditure Process 

Special Journals and Subsidiary Ledgers 

Special Journals 

Subsidiary Ledgers 

Inventory 

Perpetual versus Periodic Inventory Systems 

Gross versus Net Price Methods 

Purchasing Inventory

Reporting Inventory Purchase and Payment Events 

Human Resources 

Withholdings from Employees 

Employer Taxes 

Accounting Events in the Payroll Process 

Reporting Human Resource Events 

Other Expenditure Process Activities 

Cash Outflow before Expense (Assets Created) 

Expense before Cash Outflow (Liabilities Incurred) 

Expense Concurrent with Payment 

Reporting Other Expenditure Process Activities 

Financial Statements and the Expenditure Process 

Estimating Cash Paid for Inventory 

Estimating Cash Paid for Operating Expenses 

Internal Evaluation of Expenditure Process Events 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 9 Recording and Evaluating Conversion Process Activities 

Manufacturing Inventories 

Recording Raw Material Activities 

Recording Labor Activities 

Recording Manufacturing Overhead Events 

Actual Manufacturing Overhead 

Applied Manufacturing Overhead 

Overhead Application Process Using ABC 

Over- and Underapplied Manufacturing Overhead 

Recording Finished Goods 

Reporting Conversion Process Events 

Internal Evaluation of Conversion Process Events 

Direct Labor Variance Analysis 

Direct Materials Variances 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 10 Marketing/Sales/Collection/Customer Support Process: Recording and Evaluating Revenue Process Activities 

Revenue Recognition 

Revenue Recognized When Cash Collected 

Revenue Recognized before Cash Collected (Asset Created) 

Revenue Recognized after Cash Received (Liability Incurred) 

Sales Returns and Allowances 

Sales Discounts 

Cost of Goods Sold 

Specific Identification Method 

First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Method 

Last-In, First-Out (LIFO) Method 

Periodic Inventory System and Cost Flow Assumptions 

FIFO, LIFO, and GAPP External Reporting 

Estimating Uncollectible Credit Sales 

Proper Income Measurement 

Proper Asset Valuation 

Recording Estimated Uncollectible Accounts 

Recording Actual Uncollectible Accounts 

Reporting Revenue Process Events 

Estimating Cash Receipts from Customers 

Internal Evaluation of Revenue Process Events 

Revenue Variances 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Part Four Introduction: Capital Resource Process Activities 

Chapter 11 Time Value of Money 

Return 

Time Considerations 

Initial Investment Considerations 

Rate of Return 

Expected Rate of Return 

Risk 

Attitudes toward Risk 

Types of Risk 

Risk/Return Relationship 

Risk Premiums 

Risk/Return and Investors’ Money 

Time Value of Money 

Simple and Compound Interest 

Future Value of the Amount of $1 

Present Value of the Amount of $1 

Annuities 

Future Value of an Annuity 

Present Value of an Annuity 

How to know which tools to use

Step 1. Determine Whether the Problem Is an Annuity 

Step 2. Determine Whether the Problem Is Present or Future Value 

Step 3. Identify the Missing Element 

Step 4. Solve for the Missing Element 

More Time Value of Money Problems 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Appendix: Time Value of Money Tables 

Part Five Planning: Capital Resource Process Activities 

Chapter 12 Planning Investments: Capital Budgeting 

The Capital Budgeting Process 

Identifying Long-Term Investment Opportunities 

Tie to Business Organization and Strategy Process 

Selecting Appropriate Investments 

Net Present Value Analysis 

Assumptions of NPV 

Source of Cash Flows 

Uneven Cash Flows 

Income Taxes 

Tax Shield 

Gains and Losses on Disposal of Assets 

Comprehensive Example

Payback Method 

Other Issues 

Human Judgment 

Uncertainty 

Qualitative/Ethical Factors 

Capital Expenditures and Budgeting 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 13 Planning Equity Financing 

Tie to Business Organization and Strategy Process 

Debt versus Equity Financing 

Risk of Debt Financing 

Debt-to-Equity Ratio 

Times Interest Earned Ratio 

Reward of Debt Financing 

Return on Owners’ Equity Ratio 

Reward of Equity Financing 

Risk of Equity Financing 

Equity Financing 

Sole Proprietorships and Partnerships 

Corporations 

Planning for Partnership Equity 

Partnership Income Allocations 

Other Changes in Capital 

Planning Corporate Equity 

Common Stock 

Preferred Stock 

Return on Common Equity 

Stock Shares 

Stock Values 

Dividends 

Dividend Dates 

Stock Splits 

Corporate Equity Planning and Budgeting 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 14 Planning Debt Financing 

Debt Financing 

Long-Term Debt Instruments 

Periodic Payment (Installment) Note 

Lump-Sum Payment (Noninterest-Bearing) Note 

Periodic Payment and Lump-Sum Note 

Comparison of the Three Types of Notes 

Sources of Debt Financing 

Nonpublic Funding 

Collateral 

Leases 

Public Funding: Bonds 

Comprehensive Example: Chapters 12 through 14 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Part Six Recording and Evaluating Capital Resource Processes 

Chapter 15 Recording and Evaluating Capital Resource Process Activities: Financing 

Review of Transaction-Based Accounting Systems 

Equity Financing Activities 

Contributions by Owners (Shareholders) 

Corporate Earnings 

Corporate Distributions 

Financial Statements and Owners’ Equity Activities 

Debt Financing Activities 

Installment Notes Payable 

Noninterest-Bearing Notes Payable 

Bonds Payable: Market Rate Greater Than the Face Rate 

Bonds Payable: Market Rate Less Than the Face Rate 

Bonds Payable: Market Rate Equal to the Face Rate 

Accounting for Leases

Financial Statements and Financing Activities 

Internal Evaluation of Financing Activities 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 16 Recording and Evaluating Capital Resource Process Activities: Investing 

Plant Assets 

Acquisition of PPE 

Use of PPE 

Depreciation 

Other PPE Usage Issues 

Disposal of PPE 

Discard PPE 

Sell PPE 

Exchange PPE 

Exchanges When No Gains and Losses Are Recorded 

Natural Resources 

Intangible Assets 

Nonoperational Investments 

Internal Evaluation of Investment Activities 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Part Seven Evaluating: Operating and Capital Resource Processes 

Chapter 17 Company Performance: Profitability 

Purpose of the Income Statement 

GAAP and Comprehensive Income 

What Are Earnings? 

Earnings per Share 

Calculating Earnings per Share 

Calculating Diluted Earnings per Share 

Other Earnings per Share Disclosures 

Other Required Income Statement Disclosures 

Reporting Issues Concerning the Income Statement 

Historical Cost and Conservatism 

Cost Allocations 

Full-Absorption Costing 

Internal Profitability Reporting 

Variable and Throughput Costing Methods 

Product Line (Divisional) Income Reports 

Return on Investment for the Division 

Du Pont Method of Return on Investment 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 18 Company Performance: Owners’ Equity and Financial Position 

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Statement of Shareholders’ Equity 

Retained Earnings 

Other Disclosures 

Statement of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) 

What Is Financial Position? 

Why is the Distinction between Current and Noncurrent Items Important? 

Balance Sheet Classifications 

Assets 

Liabilities and Shareholders’ (Owners’) Equity 

Internal Financial Position Reporting 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 19 Company Performance: Cash Flows 

GAAP and the Statement of Cash Flows 

Purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows 

Sections of the Statement of Cash Flows 

Operating Activities: Cash Flows 

Brief Comparison of the Direct and Indirect Methods 

Calculation of Operating Cash Flows: Direct Method 

Calculation of Operating Cash Flows: Indirect Method 

Comparison of Direct and Indirect Methods 

Apple’s Operating Cash Flows 

Investing Activities: Cash Flows 

Calculating Investing Cash Flows 

Investing Cash Flows of Apple 

Financing Activities: Cash Flows 

Calculating Financing Cash Flows 

Financing Cash Flows of Apple 

Net Change in Cash 

Other Investing and Financing Activities 

Internal Evaluation of Cash Flows 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Chapter 20 Company Performance: Comprehensive Evaluation 

External Stakeholders 

Creditors and Investors 

Society 

Trading in Capital Markets 

Information in Capital Markets 

Issues to Consider 

Role of Independent Auditor 

Annual Report Analysis 

Studying the Financial Statements 

Industry Analysis 

Statement Analyses 

Vertical Analysis 

Horizontal Analysis 

Ratio Analysis 

Other Information 

Management’s Letter to Shareholders 

Segment and Quarterly Data 

Auditor’s Report 

Summary 

Key Terms 

Appendix Apple’s 2017 Financial Statements and Accompanying Notes 

Index 

, Also .. you can check our full list there :

list of Solution manual and Test Bank Part 1

and
 
list of Solution manual and Test Bank Part 2

and

list of Solution manual and Test Bank Part 3

What is SM, TB , IM ?

· What is the Test Bank (TB)?

An ever-expanding collection of previously administered exams, quizzes, and other assessment measures in a wide range of courses made available for current students as study aids.

Why should I use previously administered tests to study?

* become familiar with how material will be tested

* see the format of the test

* practice test-taking skills

* simulate a timed exam

* gain more experience with course content

· What is a SOLUTION MANUAL (SM)?

A Solutions Manual contains all the answers to the questions in the book with detailed explanations and examples.

· What is an INSTRUCTOR’S SOLUTION MANUAL (ISM) OR INSTURCTOR’S MANUAL (IM)?

 

An Instructor’s Manual is the guide that your teacher may use when making lesson plans and contain extra questions and answers, lab assignments, and more.

 Note: 

All solutions manual and Test Banks be in soft copy [Adobe Acrobat Reader (PDF )or Word format .Docx] 

Best wishes,
Student Saver Team ,
================

 

 

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